Lehrveranstaltungen des IZfG

Studierende der Bachelor of Arts 2-Fach-Studiengänge können die Lehrveranstaltungen des IZfG wie folgt belegen:

  • Als Basisfach "Gender Studies" (Optionale Studien ab WS 2019/20):
    Das Basismodul "Gender Studies I" wird nur im Wintersemester angeboten; verpflichtend muss die Einführungsveranstaltung belegt werden, das zweite Seminar ist frei wählbar. Das Aufbaumodul "Gender Studies II" findet im Sommersemester statt.
    Zugangsvoraussetzung für das Aufbaumodul ist das Bestehen des Basismoduls.
  • Über das Modul "Einführung in die Gender Studies" (General Studies ab WS 2012/13): Hier ist eine Belegung nur im Wintersemester möglich.
    Das Aufbaumodul im Sommersemester kann nicht als General Studies-Kurs belegt werden.

Abweichende Belegungen sind in der Regel möglich, aber im Vorfeld mit den jeweiligen Dozierenden abzusprechen.


Lehrveranstaltungen im Wintersemester 2022/23

Im Wintersemester 2022/23 sind für das Modul "Gender Studies" folgende Veranstaltungen zur Belegung geöffnet:

Was ist Geschlecht? Einführung in Theoriegeschichte und aktuelle Analysekontexte der Gender Studies [engl.](Einführungsveranstaltung, verpflichtend für Gender Studies I)

Dr.in Maria Mayerchyk | Mi, 12-14 Uhr | RAUMÄNDERUNG Seminarraum 2.14, Ernst-Lohmeyer-Platz 3

zum Moodlekurs

 

„My heart has had double of grief and trouble“: Arbeit, Körper und Geschlecht. Zusammenhänge seit 1850 [Blockveranstaltung]

Naima Tiné M.A. | Blöcke: 14.11.22 12:00-16:00 Uhr, 15:11.22 10:00-14:00 Uhr, 12.12.22 12:00-16:00 Uhr, 13.12.22 10:00-14:00 Uhr, 16.01.23 12:00-16:00 Uhr, 17.01.23 10:00-14:00 Uhr | Rubenowstr. 3, Konferenzraum IZfG

zum Moodlekurs

 

Intersectional Shakespeare

VProf.in Dr.in phil. Jennifer Henke | Do, 10-12 Uhr | Ernst-Lohmeyer-Platz 3, R 2.14

zum Moodlekurs

 

Science Fictions: Gender, Race, Class

VProf.in Dr.in phil. Jennifer Henke | Di, 16-18 Uhr | Ernst-Lohmeyer-Platz 3, R 2.05

zum Moodlekurs

 

Welche Menschen, wessen Rechte? Zur Geschichte der Menschenrechte im 19. und 20. Jahrhundert

Prof.in Dr.in phil. Annelie Ramsbrock | Mo, 14-16 Uhr | Domstr. 9a, R 3.09

zum Moodlekurs

 

Was ist Geschlecht? Einführung in Theoriegeschichte und aktuelle Analysekontexte der Gender Studies [engl.]

This discussion-based course is designed to acquaint students with key texts in gender theory from the late 1950s to the present. We begin by examining basic concepts such as gender roles and gender inequality and proceed with more complex issues related to gender performativity and biopolitics. Required readings include classic and contemporary texts representing various frameworks. Drawing on texts by Simone de Beauvoir, Raewyn Connell, Judith Butler, Michelle Foucault, Maria Lugones, Jasbir K. Puar, Jack Halberstam, Paul B. Preciado and Dean Spade, we will explore how gender, sexuality, race, nation, punitive system, capitalism, and coloniality are entangled.

Seminars will comprise a combination of lectures, discussions, and work in small groups to help students comprehend the main ideas of the offered texts. Students will also be invited to participate in a podium discussion and workshop "Appropriated feminism," that will take place at the University of Greifswald on January 17-18.

Written assignments will consist of polemic questions to the assigned texts sent to the instructor before each class (1-page each). The final course assignment will be an in-class presentation of potential activist action addressing one or several discussed social issues. The class will be taught in English.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

  • Understand and explain the main concepts of gender theory

  • Name authors of particular concepts

  • Establish connections between different forms of social inequalities

  • Compare different approaches to gender issues

  • Identify gender issues in everyday life

Zeit: mittwochs, 12-14 Uhr

Ort: Rubenowstr. 3, Konferenzraum IZfG

Lehrperson: Dr.in Maria Mayerchyk

Diese Einführungsveranstaltung muss verpflichtend belegt werden, um Gender Studies I abschließen zu können.

Zur Belegung

„My heart has had double of grief and trouble“: Arbeit, Körper und Geschlecht. Zusammenhänge seit 1850 [Blockveranstaltung]

Mit der Durchsetzung der kapitalistischen Produktionsweise in Europa etablierte sich auch ein neues Geschlechterverhältnis: Die Binarität von produktiver und reproduktiver Arbeit schlug sich auch in dem binären Geschlechtermodell, welches nur ‚männlich‘ und ‚weiblich‘ kennt, nieder. Diese Beobachtung führte in der feministischen Forschung bereits in den 1970er Jahren zu Debatten rund um ‚weibliche Arbeit‘, allen voran unentlohnter Hausarbeit und der daraus resultierenden Doppelbelastung für Frauen. In der aktuellen Forschung wird diese Perspektive erweitert und nach der generellen Konstruktion von Geschlecht durch Arbeit gefragt und inwiefern die Frage, wer welche Arbeit verrichtet, für wen und zu welchem Preis, konstituierend für Geschlecht ist.

In diesem Seminar nähern wir uns der Kategorie ‚Geschlecht‘, indem wir sie mit historischen Veränderungen in der Organisation von Arbeit verbinden. Untersucht wird, wie Geschlecht durch die Ausführung spezifischer Tätigkeiten hergestellt wurde, wie sich Arbeitsteilung in die Körper der Menschen einschrieb und welche Macht- bzw. Herrschaftsmechanismen durch vergeschlechtlichte Arbeitsteilung zum Tragen kamen.

Voraussetzungen und Leistungsanforderungen:

Bereitschaft zur umfassenden und intensiven Lektüre der Seminarliteratur, aktive Teilnahme inklusive Vorbereitung kleinerer schriftlicher oder mündlicher Beiträge, Semesterendleistung in Form einer Hausarbeit.

Blöcke:

14.11.22 12:00-16:00 Uhr

15:11.22 10:00-14:00 Uhr

12.12.22 12:00-16:00 Uhr

13.12.22 10:00-14:00 Uhr

16.01.23 12:00-16:00 Uhr

17.01.23 10:00-14:00 Uhr

Ort: Rubenowstr. 3, Konferenzraum IZfG

Lehrperson:  Naima Tiné M.A.

Zur Belegung

Intersectional Shakespeare [engl.]

This seminar aims at an intersectional approach to Shakespeare’s histories, comedies and tragedies. We will start with a discussion of the historical context, the dramatic (sub)genre(s) and then focus on a wide range of approaches from (intersectional) feminism to gender to queer studies to questions of embodiment by the example of selected texts including their cinematic adaptations. Since my classes always include theory, we will spend a significant amount of time revisiting, rereading, expanding and practicing how to apply literary and cultural theories that will aid you with your final assignment (‚Prüfungsleistung‘). Further, everyone is required to conduct a (group) presentation as a ‘test run’ to receive timely feedback on your learning progress from me and the group. To avoid heavy backlog during the semester, I recommend buying – and reading – the few literary texts as soon as possible. Last but not least, please note that this course will not only contain a significant amount of online sessions but might have to move online entirely at some point, depending on the situation. Please consider this when signing up. 

Primary texts (please buy and read – films will be provided):

Richard III

Much Ado About Nothing

Macbeth*

*Note: Feel free to choose your editions. I recommend those published by Norton or Arden as they are properly annotated. Emails asking about specific other editions or e-books cannot be answered.

 

Requirements

  • regular attendance and regard of the syllabus
  • active participation: everyone is required to prepare an oral presentation either independently or in groups on a topic of their choice
  • term paper and/or (graded) oral presentation depending on your module (please check beforehand – you will receive a data sheet to be submitted by week two)
  • you *must* have read and thoroughly prepared *all primary texts* by the time we discuss them in class; some might be fairly short while others are significantly longer and more demanding – I therefore strongly recommend buying and reading the texts as soon as possible to avoid heavy backlog during the semester!

Zeit: donnerstags, 10 - 12 Uhr

Ort: Ernst-Lohmeyer-Platz 3, R 2.05

Lehrperson:  VProf.in Dr.in phil. Jennifer Henke

Zur Belegung

Science Fictions: Gender, Race, Class [engl.]

This seminar explores the interconnections between social constructions such as gender, race and class by the example of science fiction, both literary and cinematic. Among other things, we will discuss the genre, it’s history and potential to blur boundaries between seemingly stable categories. Since my classes always include theory, we will spend a significant amount of time revisiting, rereading, expanding and practicing how to apply literary and cultural theories that will aid you with your final assignment (‚Prüfungsleistung‘). Further, everyone is required to conduct a (group) presentation as a ‘test run’ to receive timely feedback on your learning progress from me and the group. To avoid heavy backlog during the semester, I recommend buying – and reading – the few literary texts as soon as possible. Last but not least, please note that this course will not only contain a significant amount of online sessions but might have to move online entirely at some point, depending on the situation. Please consider this when signing up. 

Primary texts (please buy and read – films will be provided):

Wells, H.G. [1895]: The Time Machine. Norton: 2009.

Le Guin, Ursula K. [1969]: Left Hand of Darkness. Ace: 1987.*

*Note: Exact editions, please. Feel free to obtain second-hand versions. Emails asking about specific other editions or e-books cannot be answered.

 

Requirements

  • regular attendance and regard of the syllabus
  • small writing assignments (tba)
  • active participation: everyone is required to prepare an oral presentation either independently or in groups on a topic of their choice
  • term paper and/or (graded) oral presentation depending on your module (please check beforehand – you will receive a data sheet to be submitted by week two)
  • you *must* have read and thoroughly prepared *all primary texts* by the time we discuss them in class; some might be fairly short while others are significantly longer and more demanding – I therefore strongly recommend buying and reading the texts as soon as possible to avoid heavy backlog during the semester!

Zeit: dienstags, 16-18 Uhr
Ort: Ernst-Lohmeyer-Platz 3, R 2.05
Lehrperson: VProf.in Dr.in phil. Jennifer Henke
Zur Belegung

Welche Menschen, wessen Rechte? Zur Geschichte der Menschenrechte im 19. und 20. Jahrhundert

Beschreibung folgt.

Zeit: montags, 14-16 Uhr

Ort: Domstr. 9a, R 3.09

Lehrperson: Prof.in Dr.in phil. Annelie Ramsbrock

Zur Belegung